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Showing posts tagged racism

I might even agree with you that there may be some racism left in America, but who cares? Anyone who does or says anything racist is always punished for it immediately. So why do we even talk about it anymore?
Tom Shillue, who’s a comedian of some sort, discussing racism on a Fox News panel consisting of white people who apparently have only a passing familiarity with, well, the entirety of human history.


In the 1960s, when 20 percent of black children were found to be born out of wedlock, progressives went to war over the “tangle of pathologies” choking black America. Today, 30 percent of white children are being born out of wedlock. The reaction to this shift has been considerably more muted. This makes sense if you believe that pathology is something reserved for black people.
Ta-Nehisi Coates, “Other People’s Pathologies


Uh, wow. Apparently, this was a successful advertisement in the 1890s.



I have been called an ‘Uncle Tom.’ I have received emails and comments via social media filled with obscenity. The reactions of some who claim that YCT is creating a demeaning or degrading environment on campus have been truly disgraceful.
Lorenzo Garcia, chairman of the Young Conservatives group at the University of Texas, whining about how horrible people are for being angry at his group’s plans for a “catch an illegal immigrant” day. Yep, of course the real problem is how mean people are when they point out your obvious racism, jackass.


That last post of mine got a like from some racist blog. Not really shocking news that racists are dumb.



This is the headline and main graphic of a Washington Post article. In case you can’t make out the caption that describes what’s actually being measured here, it reads “Share the answered ‘people of another race’ when asked to pick from groups of people they would not want as neighbors.” If, like me, you’re immediately skeptical of this whole thing, but don’t know exactly what variety of bullshit we’re dealing with here, the blog Africa Is a Country has you covered. From Siddhartha Mitter’s article “The Cartography of Bullshit”:

Although the results don’t pass the sniff test in the first place, I took a look at the data as well, in an effort to identify the exact problems at play. It turns out that the entire exercise is a methodological disaster, with problems in the survey question premise and operationalization, its use by the Swedish economists and by Fisher, and, as an inevitable result, in Fisher’s additional interpretations. The two caveats that Fisher offered in his post – first, that survey respondents might be lying about their racial views, and second, that the survey data are from different years, depending on the country – only scratch the surface of what is basically a crime against social science perpetrated in broad daylight. They certainly weren’t enough to stop Fisher from compiling and posting his map, even though its analytic base is so weak as to render its message fraudulent.

Of course, Max Fisher works for a major newspaper and Siddhartha Mitter writes for a relatively obscure leftist website. Because that’s the way the world works.



Remember Joe the Plumber from the 2008 election? Apparently he’s got a website these days to share his thoughts. And his thoughts are pretty racist.



Cover of Newsweek, October 26, 1970. In his “An Open Letter to My Sister Angela Y. Davis,” James Baldwin opens by beautifully describing this cover:

One might have hoped that, by this hour, the very sight of chains on black flesh, or the very sight of chains, would be so intolerable a sight for the American people, and so unbearable a memory, that they would themselves spontaneously rise up and strike off the manacles. But, no, they appear to glory in their chains; now, more than ever, they appear to measure their safety in chains and corpses. And so, Newsweek, civilized defender of the indefensible, attempts to drown you in a sea of crocodile tears (“it remained to be seen what sort of personal liberation she had achieved”) and puts you on its cover, chained.

You look exceedingly alone—as alone, say, as the Jewish housewife in the boxcar headed for Dachau, or as any one of our ancestors, chained together in the name of Jesus, headed for a Christian land.



What the fuck is wrong with the world? Who are these people that buy $68 t-shirts?

(Source: Gawker)



I had a little fun with [John] Boehner and told him about the sun tanning tax. He goes, ‘I didn’t know it was in there,’ and I said, ‘Yes, it’s a ten percent tax.’ He goes, ‘Well, that’s not that big of a deal.’ I said, ‘It’s a racist tax.’ He goes, ‘You know what, it is.’ I had an Indian doctor in our office the other day, very dark skin, with two non-dark skin people, and I asked this to him, I said, ‘Have you ever been to a tanning booth?’ and he goes, ‘No, no need.’ So therefore it’s a racist tax and I thought I might need to get to a sun tanning booth so I can come out and say I’ve been disenfranchised because I got taxed because of the color of my skin.
Republican Congressman Ted Yoho, who seems rather confused about what the word “racism” means.


This “Cartoon of the Day” is the sort of thing that totally justifies me having made a #nanional-review-is-a-cesspool-of-bigotry tag. What is the obsession some apologists for racism have with Al Sharpton? They seem to think his mere existence somehow excuses anything that white racists ever do. Not only does National Review have this cartoon on their front page, there’s a dumb article by Jonah Goldberg (not that he’s ever written anything that isn’t dumb) about Sharpton’s membership in the Grand Havana Room, a posh Manhattan cigar club. And a slideshow of his fancy outfits. (For some reason, I can’t get the links to the cartoon or slideshow to work.)





Many years later, the people would stand up to water hoses and sheriffs’ dogs to be treated as equal. But for now the people resisted in silent, everyday rebellions that would build up to a storm at midcentury. Rocks stuffed into cotton sacks at weighing time. The COLORED ONLY signs pulled from the seat backs of public buses and converted into dartboards in dorm rooms in Georgia. Teenagers sneaking into coffee shops and swiveling on the soda fountain stools forbidden to colored people in Florida and then running out as fast as they’d come in before anybody could catch them. Each one fought in isolation and unbeknownst to the others, long before the marches and boycotts that were decades away.
Isabel Wilkinson, The Warmth of Other Suns, discussing the various little ways that blacks rebelled against Jim Crow laws before the Civil Rights Movement got its start. I think it’s always good to celebrate all the things people do to delegitimize that which oppresses them, even if they aren’t out in the streets protesting or anything.


A close aide to Sen. Rand Paul (R., Ky.) who co-wrote the senator’s 2011 book spent years working as a pro-secessionist radio pundit and neo-Confederate activist, raising questions about whether Paul will be able to transcend the same fringe-figure associations that dogged his father’s political career. Paul hired Jack Hunter, 39, to help write his book The Tea Party Goes to Washington during his 2010 Senate run. Hunter joined Paul’s office as his social media director in August 2012.

From 1999 to 2012, Hunter was a South Carolina radio shock jock known as the “Southern Avenger.” He has weighed in on issues such as racial pride and Hispanic immigration, and stated his support for the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. During public appearances, Hunter often wore a mask on which was printed a Confederate flag. Prior to his radio career, while in his 20s, Hunter was a chairman in the League of the South, which “advocates the secession and subsequent independence of the Southern States from this forced union and the formation of a Southern republic.”

Alana Goodman at The Washington Free Beacon

It must be really weird for Ron and Rand Paul to keep finding out about all the racist opinions that their close associates hold. Just one of life’s completely baffling coincidences.



Chart of racial disparities in marijuana possession arrests for the largest 25 counties in the US. From Dylan Matthews’s Washington Post article “The Black/White Marijuana Arrest Gap, In Nine Charts.”
Notice how tiny those bars are for Middlesex County, MA. I think our kinda, sorta decriminalization law went into effect at the beginning of 2009. If you follow through and look at the article, it shows the disparity in Massachusetts over several years, and that hasn’t really gone down. But the total arrests have gone down dramatically, which is definitely a good thing. Soon, King County, WA ought to start seeing zero arrests, which will nicely solve the disparity problem.
Of course, even if we start doing that all over the place, we’ve still got a racist justice system that imprisons far too many people to deal with. I wonder how many of the people pushing marijuana legalization as a huge civil rights issue will take part in that fight. But that’s a rant for another day.

Chart of racial disparities in marijuana possession arrests for the largest 25 counties in the US. From Dylan Matthews’s Washington Post article “The Black/White Marijuana Arrest Gap, In Nine Charts.”

Notice how tiny those bars are for Middlesex County, MA. I think our kinda, sorta decriminalization law went into effect at the beginning of 2009. If you follow through and look at the article, it shows the disparity in Massachusetts over several years, and that hasn’t really gone down. But the total arrests have gone down dramatically, which is definitely a good thing. Soon, King County, WA ought to start seeing zero arrests, which will nicely solve the disparity problem.

Of course, even if we start doing that all over the place, we’ve still got a racist justice system that imprisons far too many people to deal with. I wonder how many of the people pushing marijuana legalization as a huge civil rights issue will take part in that fight. But that’s a rant for another day.